Maybe Trump should try harder not to sound like a mob boss

MSNBC

The Rachel Maddow Show / The MaddowBlog

Maybe Trump should try harder not to sound like a mob boss

By Steve Benen      December 17, 2018 

Apropos of nothing, Donald Trump lashed out yesterday afternoon at his former personal attorney / “fixer”, unusual for an American president:

“Remember, Michael Cohen only became a “Rat” after the FBI did something which was absolutely unthinkable & unheard of until the Witch Hunt was illegally started. They BROKE INTO AN ATTORNEY’S OFFICE! Why didn’t they break into the DNC to get the Server, or Crooked’s office?”

To the extent that reality still has any meaning, the FBI did not “break into” Michael Cohen’s office. Rather, federal law enforcement executed a court-approved search warrant.

That’s neither “unthinkable” not “unheard of.” It happens every day. Even Trump, for all of his limitations, should be at least vaguely aware of this.

What’s more, the president’s tweet was, as best as I can tell, the first time Trump has referred to anyone publicly as a “rat” – a label he used to condemn Cohen for cooperating with law enforcement.

So what we have here is a sitting president – who’s responsible for faithfully executing the nation’s laws, who appoints federal judges, and and who chose senior members of the Department of Justice, including the attorney general and FBI director – publicly condemning someone for cooperating with federal law enforcement, while simultaneously criticizing the FBI for executing a lawful search warrant.

In other words, the line between Donald J. Trump’s rhetoric and the dialog from villains in mob movies is getting uncomfortably blurred.

There is a degree of irony to all of this. To hear the president tell it at campaign rallies, he’s a great champion of law enforcement. In practice, however, Trump’s posture toward law enforcement tends to break down into three categories:

  1. Trump opposes common law-enforcement procedures: When the president isn’t condemning the execution of lawful search warrants, he’s arguing that “flipping” witnesses should be illegal.

2. Trump opposes law-enforcement institutions: As recently as September, the president said he sees his conflict with the FBI as one of his “crowning achievements.” Trump added at the time that he sees some leaders who’ve served in federal law enforcement as “a cancer in our country.” He’s similarly referred to the DOJ as the “Department of ‘Justice’ ” – as if he believes the DOJ’s commitment to justice is in doubt – and called it “an embarrassment to our country!”

3. Trump expects the justice system to be a tool of his political agenda: This president hasn’t just undermined the judicial system by abusing his pardon powers, he’s also urged law enforcement to enforce his political vendettas – more than once – and help Republicans win elections.

In August, The Atlantic’s Jeffrey Goldberg said of this president, “He’s doing nothing less than elevating gangster ideology to the status of high principle.”

That was nearly four months ago. Trump is, if anything, sounding even more like the head of a crime family now.

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This 15-year-old activist just called out world leaders for their global inaction on climate change.

U.S. Senator Bernie Sanders
December 14, 2018

“You say you love your children above all else, yet you are stealing their futures right before their very eyes,” – This 15-year-old activist just called out world leaders for their global inaction on climate change.

15-year-old Climate Activist Calls Out World Leaders for Inaction

"You say you love your children above all else, yet you are stealing their futures right before their very eyes," – This 15-year-old activist just called out world leaders for their global inaction on climate change.

Posted by U.S. Senator Bernie Sanders on Friday, December 14, 2018

Jim Carrey’s latest artwork – If there’s a hell…..

Now an innocent seven-year-old girl has died of medical neglect because of Trump’s sadism at the border. If there’s a Hell…

December 14, 2018

Claire McCaskill Says There Are ‘Too Many Embarrassing Uncles’ in Senate

NowThis Politics shared a post.
December 15, 2018

The Senate ‘puts the ‘fun’ in ‘dysfunction”

Claire McCaskill Says There Are ‘Too Many Embarrassing Uncles’ in Senate in Farewell Remarks

Claire McCaskill Says There Are 'Too Many Embarrassing Uncles' in Senate in Farewell Remarks

Some seriously tough love from Sen. Claire McCaskill as she prepares to leave office: '[The Senate] just doesn't work as well as it used to.'

Posted by NowThis Election on Friday, December 14, 2018

Dogs Patiently Wait for Sick Owner at the Hospital

Best Life

Adorable Dogs Patiently Wait for Sick Owner at the Hospital, Go Viral

Diana Bruk              December 14, 2018
dogs wait for human outside hospital

If you’ve read about the puppy who saved his owner from a rattlesnake, or the dog who waits at a train station for 12 hours a day for his human to come home from work, you know that the love of these magical creatures knows no bounds.

However, if you have any doubts, allows us to direct your attention to a touching photo recently shared on Facebook by Cris Mamprim, a healthcare worker at Hospital Regional Alto Vale in Brazil.

At around 3 a.m. last Sunday, the hospital admitted a homeless man named César, who needed to be treated for some medical issues. When the hospital staff looked at the door, they saw a group of faithful dogs, anxiously standing at the periphery to make sure their human was all right.

Even though César is homeless, he still cares for the dogs, and that care is infinitely reciprocated, because there’s no such thing as unrequited love in the world of a dog. Mamprim wrote on Facebook:

“A simple person, without luxury, who depends on help to overcome the hunger, the cold, the pain, the evils of the world, has by his side the best companions, and the exchange is reciprocal. Exchange of love, affection, warmth, understanding. A person who confessed to us that he sometimes goes hungry in order to feed them. I don’t know what his life is like, because he’s on the street, and I don’t even want to know and judge him, but I admire the respect and love he has for [his dogs]. Seeing them like this, waiting on the door, just shows how loved and cared for they are.”

The staff invited the dogs inside, and fed both César and his canine crew. An hour later, he was discharged from the hospital, and while there’s no telling what the rest of his life will be like, you can be sure the dogs will be by his side. And for another amazing story about canines, read about this patient dog who went viral for politely obeying a cafe’s “no dogs allowed” rules.

Ryan Zinke Is Leaving Interior Department

New York Times

By Julie Turkewitz and Coral Davenport     December 15, 2018
Mr. Zinke had been the subject of at least a half-dozen federal investigations, one of which was recently referred to the Justice Department.CreditCreditCliff Owen/Associated Press.

Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke, a key figure in President Trump’s sweeping plan to reshape the nation’s environmental framework, resigned under pressure on Saturday as he faces numerous ethics investigations into his business dealings, travel and policy decisions.

“Secretary of the Interior @RyanZinke will be leaving the Administration at the end of the year after having served for a period of almost two years,” Mr. Trump wrote on Twitter. “Ryan has accomplished much during his tenure and I want to thank him for his service to our Nation.” The president said he would name a replacement this coming week.

Mr. Zinke is the latest Trump official to exit an administration plagued by questions of ethical conflict. And his departure comes as Mr. Trump has begun a shake-up in his administration. In early November, the president fired Attorney General Jeff Sessions, and last weekend he announced that his chief of staff, John F. Kelly, was leaving.

In one of the final acts of Mr. Kelly’s tenure, his team told Mr. Zinke that he should leave by year’s end or risk being fired in a potentially humiliating way, two people familiar with the discussion said.

Mr. Trump has been looking at replacing a number of other cabinet officials. He has been telling associates for weeks that the commerce secretary, Wilbur Ross, will be leaving now that the midterm elections are over, and he has also frequently complained about Betsy DeVos, the education secretary. The homeland security secretary, Kirstjen Nielsen, is also seen as likely to depart soon.

But Mr. Trump is aware that the confirmation processes for any new nominees are likely to be more contentious in the second half of his term, as he faces re-election.

Mr. Zinke, a former Montana congressman and member of the Navy SEAL’s best known for riding an Irish sport horse through Washington on his first day in office, oversaw mineral extraction and conservation on roughly 500 million acres of public land. He had become the subject of several federal investigations, one of which his department’s top watchdog has referred to the Justice Department, a potential step toward a criminal investigation.

The inquiries include an examination of a real estate deal involving Mr. Zinke’s family and a development group backed by the Halliburton chairman, David J. Lesar. Mr. Zinke stood to benefit from the deal, while Mr. Lesar’s oil services company stood to benefit from Mr. Zinke’s decisions on fossil fuel production.

Mr. Zinke has repeatedly denied wrongdoing. “I love working for the President and am incredibly proud of all the good work we’ve accomplished together,” he said on Twitter. “However, after 30 years of public service, I cannot justify spending thousands of dollars defending myself and my family against false allegations.”

Mr. Trump had tolerated the seemingly endless drips of scandal surrounding Mr. Zinke in part because he liked him personally and in part because his focus on the cabinet was concentrated on his desire to oust Mr. Sessions.

At the same time, though, Mr. Trump disliked the bad press that was amassing for Mr. Zinke, given how it reflected on him personally. And as the incoming House Democratic majority made clear that Mr. Zinke would be a prime target, Mr. Trump’s aides convinced him that the time had come to shove out Mr. Zinke.

A few months ago, the White House Counsel’s Office indicated to some West Wing aides that officials would be less likely to be subpoenaed by the new House majority if they left before the new Congress was sworn in in January. That has helped speed up the departures of several.

“This is no kind of victory, but I’m hopeful that it is a genuine turning of the page,” said Representative Raúl M. Grijalva, who as the incoming chairman of the House Natural Resources Committee has repeatedly tangled with Mr. Zinke. He added, “The next interior secretary should respect the American people’s desire for strong environmental standards and an end to corporate favoritism.”

Mr. Zinke’s exit follows that of the other major architect of the Trump administration’s environmental policies, Scott Pruitt, the administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency. Mr. Pruitt, also known for his aggressive rollback of environmental regulations, resigned in July amid questions about alleged spending abuses, first-class travel and cozy relationships with lobbyists. Among other actions, Mr. Pruitt came under fire for reaching out to the chief executive of Chick-fil-A with the intent of helping his wife open a franchise.

Beyond examining the real estate deal, the Interior Department’s inspector general had faulted Mr. Zinke for allowing his wife, Lola, to travel in government vehicles, contrary to department policy, and chided him for using $12,000 in taxpayer money to take a charter plane after a talk to a hockey team owned by one of his biggest donors.

The inspector general has also been examining the secretary’s decision to block two Native American tribes from opening a casino in Connecticut after his office received heavy lobbying from MGM Resorts International. The entertainment giant had been planning its own casino not far from the proposed tribal one.

Delaney Marsco, ethics counsel at the Campaign Legal Center, a nonpartisan watchdog group, said Mr. Zinke’s actions had sometimes been overshadowed by Mr. Pruitt’s more obvious fumbles. That let the secretary operate in an “ethical Wild West,” she said.

“There are these laws and these ethical norms that are being blown to bits by these cabinet secretaries,” Ms. Marsco said. “And that’s the pattern, the problem, that keeps us up at night.”

You’re Hired! You’re Fired! Yes, the Turnover at the Top of the Trump Administration Is … “Unprecedented.”

Since President Trump’s inauguration, White House staffers and cabinet officials have left in firings and resignations, one after the other.

The federal investigations follow several other examinations of Mr. Zinke’s behavior. He has been criticized for claiming on dozens of occasions that he is a geologist, though he has never held a job as one. When he was a candidate for Congress, campaign finance experts questioned whether it was legal for him to benefit from a super PAC that he had created. And as a Navy SEAL, he admitted to improperly billing the government $211 for a trip home to Montana, something that two admirals told The New York Times prevented him from rising to senior levels in the Navy.

Mr. Zinke’s resignation, rather than an end to his pro-fossil fuel policies, quite likely signals a passing of the playbook. Mr. Zinke’s deputy, David Bernhardt, a former oil lobbyist, is expected to step in as acting head of the department.

Mr. Zinke, 57, grew up in Whitefish, Mont., a timber and tourism town at the edge of Glacier National Park. When he took charge of the Interior Department, he promised that his youth in the West would help him balance conservation and extraction on the land in his care. Much of that land is in the West, and it includes the national parks and monuments that have become the nation’s environmental icons.

With his flashy leadership style and aggressive approach to deregulation, Mr. Zinke had largely escaped the public thrashing that Mr. Trump has directed at other cabinet members. But in recent weeks the president had signaled that the secretary’s tenure might be coming to end, possibly as a result of the ethics inquiries.

“I do want to study whatever is being said,” Mr. Trump said at a news conference on Nov. 7, referring to the investigations into Mr. Zinke. “I think he’s doing an excellent job, but we will take a look at that, and we’ll probably have an idea on that in about a week.”

Mr. Zinke was considered a surprise choice for the position. He had reportedly gained favor with Donald Trump Jr., because, like the president’s son, he is an avid game hunter.

He ran the office with a swaggering flair that won him the admiration of the president and conservative Westerners, many of whom applauded his effort to move major department operations to places like Denver or Boise, Idaho. But his style also drew derision from the environmental community and the quiet mockery of many career staff members in his own agency.

In Washington, he flew a special interior secretary flag above the Interior building when he was present, and he often skipped a coat and tie for fishing shirts and boots. Beyond the capital, he hiked and rode across landscapes in a cowboy hat, even as he pushed plans to drastically reduce monument boundaries.

In June, Politico reported that Mr. Lesar, the Halliburton chairman, was lending financial backing to a major development in Mr. Zinke’s hometown, Whitefish, that would significantly raise the value of property owned by Mr. Zinke. The development would include a hotel, shops and a brewery, and Mr. Zinke’s wife had pledged in writing to allow the developer to build a parking lot that would help make the project possible. The land for the potential lot is owned by a foundation created by Mr. Zinke.

Because Halliburton is the nation’s largest oil services company, and because Mr. Zinke regulates the oil industry on public land, the deal raised questions as to whether it constituted a conflict of interest. Mr. Zinke’s schedule also showed that he had hosted Mr. Lesar and a developer involved with the hotel-brewery project in his secretarial office in 2017.

In response, three Democrats sent a letter to the Interior Department’s top watchdog, Mary L. Kendall, requesting an investigation into whether Mr. Zinke had used his position as secretary for personal financial gain. In July, Ms. Kendall complied, opening an investigation. In October, her department forwarded at least one inquiry to the Justice Department.

Heather Swift, a spokeswoman for Mr. Zinke, has said that the secretary did nothing wrong and that he resigned from his charitable foundation’s board of directors before the deal was made.

Before Mr. Zinke joined the Trump administration, he often called himself a conservative conservationist. But as secretary, he quickly became one of the chief proponents of Mr. Trump’s energy-first agenda, promoting policies that seek to open the East Coast to offshore drilling, weaken the standards of the Endangered Species Act and shrink two national monuments, constituting the largest rollback of federal land protection in the nation’s history.

Last year under Mr. Zinke, the United States offered up 12.8 million acres of federally controlled oil and gas parcels for lease, triple the average offered during President Barack Obama’s second term, according to an analysis by The New York Times.

These policies won Mr. Zinke favor with Mr. Trump, who had made promotion of the fossil fuel industry a key part of his campaign platform, as well as from the oil and gas companies that had increasingly made up Mr. Zinke’s donor base as a Montana politician.

His policies have angered environmentalists, who have filed lawsuits trying to block these plans. Many have argued that Mr. Zinke has turned his back on the nation’s environmental heritage just as dire news about climate change has made land, water and air protection increasingly urgent.

The likely replacement by Mr. Bernhardt of his former boss in an acting capacity echoes events that followed the resignation of Mr. Pruitt at the E.P.A. Mr. Pruitt, once a favorite of Mr. Trump’s for many of the same reasons as Mr. Zinke, was replaced in an acting capacity by his deputy, Andrew Wheeler, a former coal lobbyist with a low profile and a deep knowledge of the agency he ran and the regulations he sought to undo.

While Mr. Zinke spent his tenure as the face of many of the Trump administration’s efforts, many on the inside saw Mr. Bernhardt as the effective manager who was able to push policies through. Mr. Bernhardt, with years of experience in the George W. Bush administration, and as a former lawyer and lobbyist for some of the nation’s largest oil companies, brings a deep insider’s knowledge to his job that Mr. Zinke lacked. His former legal clients included the Independent Petroleum Association of America and Halliburton.

Since his Senate confirmation last summer, Mr. Bernhardt has generated criticism from environmental and government watchdog groups that his new role will create a conflict of interest, as he oversees proposals that could directly benefit his former clients.

Maggie Haberman and Sheryl Gay Stolberg contributed reporting.

7-year-old immigrant girl dies after Border Patrol arrest

Associated Press

7-year-old immigrant girl dies after Border Patrol arrest
Associated Press        December 14, 2018

Wisconsin Republicans couldn’t accept that Scott Walker lost an election

Vice News posted an episode of Vice News Tonight
December 14, 2018

Wisconsin Republicans couldn’t accept that Scott Walker lost an election.

So they did this. And he just signed it into law.

Wisconsin Republicans Are Trying to Strip Power From Newly Elected Democrats

Wisconsin Republicans couldn't accept that Scott Walker lost an election.So they did this. And he just signed it into law.

Posted by VICE News on Friday, December 14, 2018

Scott Walker Signs Wisconsin GOP’s Massive Power Grab Into Law

Trump says GM shift to electric vehicles is ‘not going to work’

Reuters

Trump says GM shift to electric vehicles is ‘not going to work’

WASHINGTON — President Donald Trump on Thursday said General Motors’ decision to shift much of its focus to electric vehicles will not succeed, and he asserted a new trade deal will make it harder for the company to move work to other countries.

GM last year said it planned to launch 20 new electric vehicles by 2023 as it faces rising regulatory requirements for zero-emission vehicles in China and elsewhere.

The largest U.S. automaker has come under enormous criticism in Washington after it announced on Nov. 26 plans to close four plants in the United States and cut up to 15,000 jobs in North America.

Trump questioned GM CEO Mary Barra’s business strategy in an interview with Fox News. “They’ve changed the whole model of General Motors. They’ve gone to all-electric. All-electric is not going to work … It’s wonderful to have it as a percentage of your cars, but going into this model that she’s doing I think is a mistake,” Trump said.

Barra was on Capitol Hill for two days of meetings last week to discuss the company’s decision with angry lawmakers from states where plants are closing. “To tell me a couple weeks before Christmas that’s she’s going to close in Ohio and Michigan — not acceptable to me,” Trump said.

Trump has repeatedly said GM should reverse a decision to close an assembly plant in northeast Ohio, an area potentially crucial in the 2020 presidential election. “Ohio is going to replace those jobs in like two minutes,” Trump said. “She’s either going to open fast, or somebody else is going to go in.”

GM shares fell 1.4 percent in trading Thursday.

Asked to respond, GM said it timed its job cut announcement so employees could accept open jobs at other plants.

“We continue to produce great vehicles today for our customers while taking steps toward our vision of a world with zero crashes, zero emissions and zero congestion,” GM said.

Trump suggested that a new free trade deal with Mexico and Canada makes it “very uncomfortable” for GM to build cars outside the United States.

“I don’t like that General Motors does that … General Motors is not going to be treated well,” he said without elaborating.

Trump signed a new trade deal with Mexico and Canada on Nov. 30 to replace the North American Free Trade Agreement, but that deal has not been approved by the U.S. Congress.

The deal boosts the North American content requirements for vehicles to be traded tariff free and requires a significant percentage of vehicles to be made by workers earning at least $16 an hour.

Some Democrats argue the trade deal may need changes to deter GM and other automakers from continuing significant production in Mexico. GM is not backing off its plans to build the new Chevrolet Blazer SUV in Mexico.

Reporting by David Shepardson and Lisa Lambert